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Bonnie and Clyde

WHAT A GREAT MOVIE TO END THE SEMESTER WITH. I absolutely love this movie. WAYYY too much violence if you ask me, but man.. is it a good movie! The last scene will forever stay in my head, of Bonnie and Clyde’s bodies with sooo many bullet holes. Nothing can ever take that image out of my head. I love how they are so proud of what they do. “We rob banks”.  Blanch is a real character, who makes a heck of a difference in the movie.. she adds the craziness of it all. As if it wasn’t crazy enough that they seem to love to take pictures with guns, flashing and showing off that they are “bad.” Was it only me, or did anyone else watching it for the first time, worry that they would run out of gas at some point during the movie when they were trying to get rid of the police? Anywho, goooooooooood movie. Definitely adding this to my list of “must watch again.” :)

Charulata (The Lonely Wife)

What an extremely long opening!! Call me inpatient if you wish.. but honestly, I was already bored by the 3 minutes of just watching her stitching in the opening shot. I noticed there is a lot of music in the background, which is interesting.. and she also follows sounds that she hears. There is a lot of weird unusual sounds in the movie and I didn’t quite understand why she would always look through the magnifying glass. I was pretty lost majority of the time during the movie. A couple observations I made were: the man is so into his book, he doesn’t even notice her standing there, we see the back of the woman the whole time while he was eating, and we have no idea how she looks like (which is weird). The movie moved in such a slow pace, that made it difficult to want to watch. There were some interesting shots and angles while she was on the swing. Lastly, I wonder.. why was their dog barking when they were arm wrestling?

Analysis Project #2: Formal Analysis

The introduction of the term “the male gaze” created by Laura Mulvey can be traced back to her essay “Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema” that was published in 1975. In her essay, Mulvey states that in film, women are typically the objects rather than the possessors of gaze. We are shown different perspectives of both genders in films through formal techniques, such as camera placement, character movements, and sound. Females in most cases are able to use their bodies and charm to test a male’s attraction towards them. As a part of human nature, males have the tendency to be easily attracted to women, especially beautiful women. Depending on the female characters, in some movies, females are usually able to make the males fall for them with their tactics like their character, personality as well as how they talk to them.

The scene I have chosen to analyze is from “The Lady Eve” with Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda. This scene from Preston Sturges’ romantic screwball comedy is when Jean brings Charles to her cabin to change her heels that he has broken when she deliberately tripped him. The music in the background also sets a romantic mood for us the audience to expect something romantic to happen.

The scene starts with her opening the door, turning on the lights and throwing a shirt that was on the shoe dresser to the side. He takes a few steps into the room, looks around and makes a comment that “It’s quite a cabin.” After sniffing around a few times, he said, “Holy Moses.” When she asked, “What’s the matter?” He answers, “That perfume,” claiming that there weren’t any perfume used in the Amazon. She then leads him to the shoe dresser where she said since he was so polite, he could pick one out and put them on for her if he likes. He once again says, “Holy Moses” when he saw all her shoes. When she asked, “See any you like?” He didn’t answer and paused for a bit just staring at her. We can notice how she stands with her elbow leaning on the cabinet door while he’s looking at the shoes, as if she’s posing for him.

She does a lot of seductive gazing at him while he’s picking out a pair of shoes, and keeping eye contact on him for almost the entire time. She goes to sit down on the chair, and crosses her legs and tells him he’ll have to kneel down to put the heels on for her. Although she can easily put the shoes on herself, this can be seen as Jean wanting to give a chance for Charles to touch her legs and be close to her. There is a shot where Jean is sitting and looking up at Charles, where he is cut off from the shoulders. The way I interpret this shot is that Jean wants to test her ability to make Charles do what she says. The moment Charles enters the frame is his willingness to go down on his knees to help her. When Charles puts the heels on her feet, he first stares at her face, then at her legs. They gaze at each other, and at one point Charles got blurry vision, which I assume he was mesmerized by her beauty.

She asked him what he was doing in the Amazon, and he tells her he was looking for snakes. He quickly explained the difference between beer and ale when she said she thought he was in the beer business. He then makes a comment that, “It’s funny to be kneeling here at your feet talking about beer.” When she helps him by fixing the straps of her heels by herself, he grabs her hands and stares into her eyes. They then gaze into each other’s eyes, and she deepens her voice when she says, “We better get back now.” Although we aren’t exactly sure how Jean is really feeling at this moment towards Charles, we were able to see her gazes at him moments before. So we can only imagine that she must at least want to attract Charles if not already be attracted to him as well. We can see how she looks down at his lips when he talks and occasionally glances back up at his eyes. They both get up at the same time, while he is still fixed on her eyes. We have to keep in mind that they have just met not too long ago, and yet he’s holding her hand and talking in a romantic tone to her already.

When Charles says, “Something about that perfume,” Jean asks, “Don’t you like my perfume?” Charles answers by saying, “Like it? I’m cock-eyed by it.” He then leans towards her lips, and she puts her hand on his chest pushing him back and walks away smiling and saying, “You ought to be kept in a cage.” This walking away gesture makes Charles even more attracted to Jean. At this point, the scene ends with Charles continuing to stare at her and fixing his bowtie, while still looking a little lost and helpless because of her beauty.

Costuming plays a significant part in this scene. Charles is dressed in a nice white suit with a bowtie that we see attracts Jean and causes her to be fixed on him when he’s in the room. Jean is in a tight black dress that reveals a bit of her stomach, which is an attractive article of clothing for most men like Charles to see. The way she stands leaning on the shoe dresser door also says something about her. She is standing as if she is sticking her chest out with one hand on her waist confidently trying to capture Charles’s attention to her body. The shot where we see Jean as a blurry image is Charles’s point of view, maybe caused by her beauty that makes him feel dizzy. These examples agree with Mulvey’s formulation of “the male gaze.”

Although this scene predominantly emphasizes “the male gaze,” we are able to tell that they are both some what attracted to each other. Jean reeled him in, with her beauty, her charm, as well as her ability to make him long for more of her. The gesture of Jean pushing Charlie back from kissing her might reveal that she’s playing “hard to get.”

Psycho

I always heard Psycho, by Alfred Hitchcock was a great movie. But it wasn’t until I saw it in class for the first time did I really know how true that statement is. To be honest, and you may call me a little slow if you wish, but I’m still a little lost in terms of when Norman Bates was having the conversation with Marion in his office. Was that really him or his mom.. Or both? Like I get the whole idea of him killing his mother because of jealousy and whatnot.. But when (he) said, “A boy’s bestfriend is his mother.” was that really what Norman Bates was thinking? Or his mother? And then same for when he said, “I hate what she’s become. I hate the illness.” Those parts confuse the heck out of me. Also noticed the whole pattern of birds, pictures of them hung on the wall in the room, the stuffed birds hung on the wall in the office, and Norman Bates mentioning how she “eats like a bird.” The whole idea of how they’re passive, but its creepy how they’re like watching you. Very contradictive in my mind. Going back a little to an earlier point in the film, I want to talk about the scenes of her driving when she’s running away. We are hearing diegetic sounds, that are internal which convey thoughts and state of minds. In this case, we are hearing Marion’s thoughts as she’s driving. Also the music we hear while she’s driving is so dramatic, and makes the scene so much more intense to watch. I like how as we’re watching it in the beginning, we’re thinking how the cop is the bad guy or something, who’s out to get her.. but that was only a divergence and the motel boy who looked absolutely harmless was the actual guy to be on the look out for. And lastly, I want to comment on how she could be okay with having all that money in one place.. and then to put it in the newspaper?! like really? but I like how Hitchcock would shoot from the angle of the newspaper that the money was hidden in, so that the audience can see it in every shot.  Oh yeah, the shower scene was insane! Even though its very fake, you just don’t expect it.. and after so many times of repeated movements of the camera “stabbing” her, we get the point. Overall, Psycho is a crazy movie, no pun intended. Great movie. Just absolutely great in my opinion.

Invasion of the Body Snatchers

I was never a real fan of Sci-fi’s.. but that was until I watched Invasion of the Body Snatchers. This movie had me on the edge of my seat in class. No lie, I was confused at certain points in the movie. I kept having to ask myself, what is going on?! Especially in the beginning when the people were saying how so and so weren’t they’re so and so. It seemed as though everyone was crazy and I didn’t know what to think. Anywho, the part that stands out the most to me from the movie would be when its a long shot of when they were handing out the pods, and everyone from all different sides walks up to the center. That scene was pretty daunting to watch because I could not picture if somewhere in New York that was to happen, I’d be completely freaked out if I had to witness that. Then the moment that they all disperse into different directions.. how freaky. I also found it kind of interesting how there is so much running in the movie. I feel bad for the actors if they had to do multiple takes of all that. I really enjoyed the movie.. and it was definitely a treat to watch it after the midterm. I will certainly watch it again (and again) in the future, so hopefully I’ll understand it more and more each time.  I encourage everyone to do the same, because although I didn’t get the entire movie from the first watch.. I do know that it was really that good.

Analysis Project #1: Shot-by-shot breakdown of a scene

Scene analysis: from M (dir. Fritz Lang, Nero Film, 1931)

23 shots from Elsie’s home, when the clock strikes noon, where Elsie’s mother is preparing lunch for her girl who she is expecting should be coming home from school.

Part 1.

SHOT 1:

Framing:

CU

Camera Placement:

Shot slightly from a low angle. POV shot (as if Elsie’s mother was looking at the clock).

Description of the content:

Clock. Ringing/chirping because strike of noon. Elsie’s mother smiles after looking at the clock and shakes the suds from her hands.

Composition:

Clock is placed on the wall, shown in the center between kitchen utensils.

Lighting:

Normal. Sunlight coming in from the windows. Shadow of the clock cast on the wall.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. There is movement by the clock. The bird is coming in and out of the peephole, and the bells are striking back and forth.

Sound/Music:

“Cuckooing of the bird” coming from the clock. As well as the ringing of a church bell.

Shot Duration:

Short take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 2:

Framing:

MS

Camera Placement:

Shot straight on.

Description of the content:

Elsie’s mother smiles after looking at the clock and shakes the suds from her hands.

Composition:

Laundry. Washboard, buckets.

Lighting:

Normal. Sunlight coming in from the windows.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. There is movement by Elsie’s mother who shakes the suds from her hands/arms.

Sound/Music:

”Cuckooing of the bird” coming from the clock. As well as the ringing of a church bell.

Shot Duration:

Short take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 3:

Framing:

LS

Camera Placement:

Shot straight on.

Description of the content:

School entrance. People in heavy coats standing by the doors.

Composition:

Most people are in black coats. Everyone is facing the doors. Somewhat of a balanced composition; doors are in the middle.

Lighting:

Normal. Outdoors.

Depth of Field:

Strong depth of field, as if shot from across the street.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. Cars in the shot are driving by, and bicyclist is peddling by. People are making slight movements and chatting with the people by them, and one man is smoking.

Sound/Music:

Church bell continues to ring. Honking of a car horn.

Shot Duration:

Short take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 4:

Framing:

LS

Camera Placement:

Shot straight on from a side view.

Description of the content:

Elsie’s mother is by the stove tasting the food.

Composition:

Lots of kitchen utensils shown; pots, cups, plates, etc. Smoke coming from the hot food.

Lighting:

Normal. Sunlight coming in from the windows.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. Elsie’s mother lifts the cover from the pot, stirs it up a bit and brings the spoon near her mouth to taste the food and smiles.

Sound/Music:

Church bell continues to ring, slowly fainting away.

Shot Duration:

Short take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 5:

Framing:

LS

Camera Placement:

Shot straight on

Description of the content: 

Elise is waving bye to her 2 friends. While doing so, she goes onto the street without realizing and almost gets hit by a car. The sound of the honk scares her and she immediately backs away onto the sidewalk. Cross-guard then approaches her and helps her to cross the street.

Composition:

Man in a big coat and wearing a hat is the background. His shadow is cast on the wall as he is walking along. Then we see two woman and a man walk by. This man is also in a big coat and wearing a hat, and is carrying what looks like a briefcase in his arms.

Lighting:

Normal. Outdoors. Shadows are formed.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. People in the shot are moving. Cars are driving by.

Sound/Music:

Honking of the car horn.

Shot Duration:

Short take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 6:

Framing:

MS

Camera Placement:

Shot straight on.

Description of the content: 

Elsie’s mother is setting up the table.

Composition:

Cabinet in the background, filled with white dishes. Chair is pulled out. 

Lighting:

Normal. Sunlight coming in from the windows. Shadows on the right side.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. Elsie’s mother places the cup, the rolled up napkin on the table, and then wipes the dish with a towel. She is meticulous when we see her move the napkin slightly as if to make sure it is in the “perfect spot.”

Sound/Music:

Clattering of the plates.

Shot Duration:

Short take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 7:

Framing:

LS

Camera Placement:

Shot straight on.

Description of the content:

Elsie is bouncing the ball (14 times) and walking up to the poster. We learn the little girl’s name is Elsie Beckmann.

Composition:

People walking by, shadows of them cast on the floor and walls. Man in long coat and hat leaning on pole reading newspaper. Shadow of the mysterious man against the “poster of the wanted murderer.”

Lighting:

Normal. Outdoors. Many shadows are formed in the shot.

Camera Movement:

Trucking as Elsie is walking on the sidewalk and bouncing the ball. As she throws the ball up against the poster, camera tilts up so we can read the poster.

Sound/Music:

Bouncing of the ball. We hear the voice of the mysterious man who talks to Elsie.    Then we hear Elsie’s voice.

Shot Duration:

Long take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 8:

Framing:

MS

Camera Placement:

Shot straight on.

Description of the content: 

Elsie’s mother standing by the table, putting finishing touches into the food.

Composition:      

Cabinet in the background, filled with white dishes. Chair is pulled out. 

Lighting:

Normal. Sunlight coming in from the windows. Shadows are formed in the shot..

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. Elsie’s mother is slicing ingredients to put into the food. Then she looks up at the clock.  

Sound/Music:

Faint sound of the cover of the bowl being placed on the table.

Shot Duration:

Short take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 9:

Framing:

CU

Camera Placement:

POV shot. Shot slightly from a low angle.

Description of the content:

Clock. Reads 12:20pm. POV shot – it’s what Elsie’s mother is looking at.

Composition:

Clock is placed on the wall, shown in the center between kitchen utensils.

Lighting:

Normal. Shadow of the clock cast on the wall.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. There is movement by the clock. Clock chimes are swinging back and forth.

Sound/Music:

No sound.

Shot Duration:

Short take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 10:

Framing:

MS

Camera Placement:

Shot straight on.

Description of the content: 

Elsie’s mother looking at the clock while standing by the table, putting finishing touches into the food.

Composition:

Cabinet in the background, filled with white dishes. Chair is pulled out. 

Lighting:

Normal. Sunlight coming in from the windows. Shadows are formed in the shot.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. Elsie’s mother is cutting ingredients into the bowl of food. She places the cover over the bowl again. As she hears the sound of footsteps in the hallway, she smiles and heads to open the door.

Sound/Music:

Sound of footsteps in the staircase.

Shot Duration:

Short take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

This was a reverse shot. Straight cut.

SHOT 11:

Framing:

LS

Camera Placement:

Shot from low angle (as if looking from the bottom of the stairs – POV shot)

Description of the content: 

Top of the staircase. 2 girls going up the stairs (same girls Elsie was waving bye to earlier).

Composition:

Staircase and windows.

Lighting:

Normal.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. Girls are walking up the stairs.

Sound/Music:

Sound of footsteps going up the stairs. Elsie’s mother talks to the girls. The girls answer.

Shot Duration:

Long take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 12:

Framing:

LS

Camera Placement:

Shot straight on.

Description of the content:

Elsie’s mother standing by the railing of the staircase looking up at the 2 girls. 

Composition:

Staircase. Door is open.

Lighting:

Normal.

Camera Movement: 

Camera is still. Elsie’s mother looks up at the 2 girls and then down to the bottom floor. She walks back into the house and closes the door.

Sound/Music:

Sound of the girls’ footsteps still in motion.

Shot Duration:

Short take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

This was a reverse shot. Straight cut.

SHOT 13:

Framing:

LS

Camera Placement:

Shot from somewhat of a high angle.

Description of the content:

Old blind man is selling balloons/toys by a staircase. Man wearing a hat in a long coat is buying Elsie a balloon doll (with eyes, arms, body and legs).   

Composition:

Round staircase. Balloons. Small toys. Old man with a “blind” sign around his neck.

Lighting:

Normal.

Depth of Field:

Long depth of field, as if standing far away from them.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. People in the shot are making movements (Man in long coat is getting money out of his pocket. Old blind man is passing the balloon doll to Elsie). Man places money into the old blind man’s hand. Elsie walks next to the man as they take off.

Sound/Music:

Car horns. Whistling of a unique tune by the man in the long coat. Elsie’s voice.

Shot Duration:

Long take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 14:

Framing:

MS to a LS.

Camera Placement:

Shot straight on.

Description of the content:

Elsie’s mother is standing by the stove.

Composition:

In the kitchen. Walks to the door. We see the postman Mr. Gehrke.

Lighting:

Normal.

Depth of Field:

Long depth of field. See the stairs and window behind the postman.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still at first. Then it pans left to the door. Elsie’s mother walks out of the shot as she says “Just a moment.” Elsie’s mother comes back into the shot, and then we see Mr. Gehrke walk up the stairs. Just as Elsie’s mother was about to close the door, she decides to go out into the hallway and look down to the bottom of the staircase.

Sound/Music:

Door bell rings. Elsie’s mother talking to Mr. Gehrke.

Shot Duration:

Long take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 15:

Framing:

LS

Camera Placement:

POV shot. Shot from above as if looking down.

Description of the content: 

Quiet empty staircase with no sight of Elsie.

Composition:

Lots and lots of stairs.

Lighting:

Normal.

Depth of Field:

Long depth of field.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still.

Sound/Music:

Elsie’s mother shouts “Elsie!”

Shot Duration:

Short take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 16:

Framing:

LS

Camera Placement:

Shot straight on.

Description of the content: 

Elsie’s mother is standing by the staircase railing in the hallway.

Composition:

Door. Window. Staircase.

Lighting:

Normal.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. Elsie’s mother is walking back into the house and closes the door. She looks up at the clock.

Sound/Music:

Shutting of the door.

Shot Duration:

Long take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

This was a reverse shot. Straight cut.

SHOT 17:

Framing:

CU

Camera Placement:

POV shot. Shot slightly from a low angle.

Description of the content:

Clock. Reads 1:15pm. POV shot – it’s what Elsie’s mother is looking at.

Composition:

Clock is placed on the wall, shown in the center between kitchen utensils.

Lighting:

Normal. Shadow of the clock cast on the wall.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. There is movement by the clock. Clock chimes are swinging back and forth.

Sound/Music:

Bird from the clock chirps once.

Shot Duration:

Short take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 18:

Framing:

MS

Camera Placement:

Shot straight on.

Description of the content: 

Elsie’s mother standing by the door looking very concerned. She puts her hand to her stomach (clenching it). She walks towards the window.

Composition:

In the kitchen. Elsie’s mother has the magazine in her hand. She moves this bottle from the window out of her way. We see the laundry she was washing.

Lighting:

Normal.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still at first. Then pans right to follow Elsie’s mother to the window. Elsie’s mother makes a face when she hears the noise from outside, and proceeds to go see what is going on. She opens the window and screams out “Elsie” numerous times.

Sound/Music:

Hears voice of a man coming from outside the window. Thud from the bottle by the window when she moves it. Elsie’s mother shouting out “Elsie!” (2 times)

Shot Duration:

Long take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

This was a reverse shot. Straight cut.

SHOT 19:

Framing:

LS

Camera Placement:

Shot from high angle as if looking down to the bottom of the staircase.

Description of the content: 

Quiet empty staircase with no sight of Elsie.

Composition:

Lots and lots of stairs.

Lighting:

Normal.

Depth of Field:

Long depth of field.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still.

Sound/Music:

Elsie’s mother shouts “Elsie!”

Shot Duration:

Short take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 20:

Framing:

LS

Camera Placement:

Shot straight on.

Description of the content:

Quiet empty attic.

Composition:

Clothes hanging.

Lighting:

Dark. With minimal lighting coming in from the small windows.

Depth of Field:

Long depth of field.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still.

Sound/Music:

Elsie’s mother shouts “Elsie!” (2 times)

Shot Duration:

Long take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 21:

Framing:

CU

Camera Placement:

Shot from a high angle.

Description of the content: 

The setting on the table.

Composition:

Empty plate, empty cup, empty chair (which is not straight).

Lighting:

Normal.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still.

Sound/Music:

No sound.

Shot Duration:

Long take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 22:

Framing:

LS

Camera Placement:

Shot from a high angle.

Description of the content:

The ground (grass) with Elsie’s ball rolling out from the side.

Composition:

Grass, leaves, Elsie’s ball.

Lighting:

Normal. Outdoors. With shadows formed in the shot.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. Elsie’s ball rolls out from the right side into the center of the shot.

Sound/Music:

No sound.

Shot Duration:

Long take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Straight cut.

SHOT 23:

Framing:

LS

Camera Placement:

Shot from a low angle.

Description of the content:

Telephone lines with the balloon doll that Elsie was given earlier. 

Composition:

Lots of telephone lines. Sense of balanced composition with the tower being in the middle.

Lighting:

Normal. Outdoors.

Camera Movement:

Camera is still. The balloon doll is floating and eventually flies away out of the shot.

Sound/Music:

No sound.

Shot Duration:

Long take.

Edits/Transition to the next shot:

Fades out into black.

———————————————————————————————————————

Part 2.

This scene early in the movie introduces to the viewers what the film is going to be about. We can notice a lot of patterns revolving around circles or round objects. Such as the shots of the clock, Elsie’s ball, the balloon doll given to Elsie, as well as the empty plate on the table. There is also a large amount of shadows in the shots. We see that the mysterious man talking to Elsie is presented as a shadow. Almost every shot, shadows of people or objects are cast on the walls or on the ground. Another thing I have noticed is that in various shots, there are men in long coats and wearing a hat in the background. Some of which are more obvious than others, like in shot 7, there is a man leaning against a pole reading a newspaper. Lastly, the sounds we hear in the scene all send out a sense of tension. Like in shot 5 when the car almost hits Elsie, we hear honking. When Elsie was given the balloon doll, there is also the sound of honking as well as the whistling tune by the man Elsie was with.

———————————————————————————————————————

Part 3.

The emphasis of circles or round objects may be used to help understand the movie and how things happen. The round clock is what tells us that time has passed and shows that Elsie is not home yet. The ball Elsie was bouncing as she was walking down the sidewalk was found lying around by itself on the grass. The balloon doll given to Elsie was found floating in the air by itself. Also the empty plate on the table reveals to us that it has been untouched, showing that Elsie has not come home at all. Although we don’t see what exactly happened to Elsie, these shots allow us to imagine what has happened and to expect it to be something negative. Some viewers may get the message of karma from the emphasis of these round objects, like the saying, “What goes around comes around,” as in the wanted murderer in the poster will eventually get what he deserves.

There is also a large amount of shadows in the shots. We see that the mysterious man talking to Elsie is presented as a shadow, therefore we are left wondering who this man could be until he is revealed to us. Shadows could be used to convey the existence of the underground world, as well as the murderer who has to live in his “shadow” and is trying to hide from the world.

In many shots, we see men in long coats and wearing a hat. I feel as though these men are purposely added in the shots to make us guess who could be the killer. Since we are only given a shadow of the mysterious man at first, who we are able to tell from the shadow image is wearing a long coat and a hat, we tend to question if any man we see in the shot can possibly be the murderer. By doing this, Lang makes it as though any man on the street in a long coat and wearing a hat is possible of being the murderer, so that we have to keep paying attention until the killer is revealed.

It can be determined as foreshadow when the car almost hits Elsie in Shot 5. Whenever something bad is about to happen, we hear either the honking of car horns and/or the tune of the man’s whistling.

Umberto D

I noticed how everything is changing in the apartment except the corridors of Maria.

It must of sucked to have to hear all those sounds while having a fever. It’s almost sad that aside from everything else he seems to have no control over, Umberto couldn’t even control his alarm clock from ringing, and had to hide it under his blanket until the sound went away.

The dog pound is parallel with people’s feelings. Like dogs are “disposable,” so are human feelings.

Patterns I’ve noticed were: spraying of the ants with the water, the emphasis of ants (on the walls in the kitchen and in Umberto’s bed), the part on the wall by the stove filled with scratch marks made with matches by Maria, etc.

Maria looks out of the window at the cat on the roof, as if to show that the cat is free while she is trapped inside. She proceeds to go grind coffee. When she cries, we as the audience see her pain and wonders all that she could be going through. For a girl so young like her, it must be tough.

We see that they love each other, but have their own problems. When the nurse asked Umberto if that was his daughter, he was quick to nod while Maria was quick to say no. This seemed awkward and left a bit of resentment maybe, since they don’t seem to agree on their closeness. Umberto feels as if he’s the girl’s father, but we see that she doesn’t feel the same way. You would think that since both people are in tough situations, they would want to claim their “related” so they can feel closer, but this is not the case here.

I like the part where Umberto was “forced” to buy a cup in order to make change since he needed to pay the driver. The way he threw that cup away after was eye-catching. I couldn’t believe it, for someone in tough times like him, I didn’t think he would throw it away like that. He could have sold it. Or gave it to Maria. Or better yet, kept it for himself. But no.. he threw it on the ground. Why? BEATS ME.

We see the idea that there’s conflict after conflict.  But Life goes on.

I noticed the portrayal of power dynamics when we see Umberto’s friend on the bus, who appeared to be at a higher level. He is presented as a “higher” figure because Umberto was going to ask him for help with money, so that makes Umberto’s character diminishing and powerlessness compared to his friend.

I was very anxious to find out if Flike was okay. I thought maybe the dog would die. Therefore, Umberto would find no reason to live since he’d be so lonely, and by the looks of it.. he wouldn’t be able to live without his companion. And the movie would end there. But believe me, I was glad to see that Flike made it. That meant there was some hope that the movie could get better, and things will start turning around in the sense that if Flike is alright, everything will be alright.

I noticed the repetitive action of the landlord clearing her throat and turning off the light in the hallway. Could this be her routine every night after collecting money from people she lets “sleep and use” her rooms? Any ideas why she has to clear her throat the way she does? Is this even a significant repetition in the movie?

We don’t know what Umberto is going to do at the end of the movie, it’s unknown.. and left for us the viewers to decide.  Unsatisfying ending if you ask me.  Because if you have me think of the ending myself.. I’m going to assume the dog dies, and he will die of sadness.

Double Indemnity

I noticed particularly a lot of dark shots in the movie Double Indemnity directed by Bully Wilder.  The settings “swallow” the characters up in the film in terms of how the characters are perceived as. Like the many stylistic characteristics of film noir, there is an emphasis on night rather than daylight. If we pay close attention, a lot of the movie is shot during the night and most scenes are really dark with minimal lighting. There are compositions created through the interplay between areas of light and dark. Most importantly, this movie is made up of the strong use of shadow and darkness.

Citizen Kane

This movie contained a lot of techniques of different angles, lighting as well as the introduction of creative shots used in the movie world. We see extreme and weird close-ups, and sounds used to create distance (through the scenes of when Kane is shouting across the room to his wife putting a puzzle together). The famous scene is of when Kane’s parents were sending him away for school. We see Kane in the background playing outside in the snow, who has no say in the decision of his departure and does not get a say in his own fate. Then Kane’s father is in the mid-ground, with no power of deciding where his boy goes. And lastly, in the foreground, there’s the bank broker and his mother who is signing the papers and has the power to send her child away for school.  We see a pattern of violence, when Kane madly breaks things and terrorizes his wife’s room and we also see when Susan gets slapped.  Through the entire movie, we as the audience are trying to figure out what “rosebud” is, which is what Kane’s last words were before he died. When we are shown the glass ball rolling onto the floor and broken into pieces, it helps us to perceive a tragedy.. which in this case, was his death.  Like everyone else I would assume, I found the mirror shots super cool. Like his reflections when he was walking down that hall was shown in the most profound way ever. I also like the use of lights / shadows and the size of bodies to show power dynamics. The scene of when the people were throwing things into the furnace is when we ultimately figure out what “rosebud” is. Turns out it is what it says on his sled that he got for Christmas. Who would have thought. Interesting movie overall. Definitely considered a classic in the film world because of its many interesting shots.

The Lady Eve

Director and Screenwriter, Preston Sturges did a fantastic job with this movie, The Lady Eve in portraying the idea of conning people, through gambling or false identity. Early in the movie, we are introduced the idea of card tricks and con men. I found a lot of humor in the movie that actually made me “laugh out loud.” Like the scenes of “the fat man” wanting his food in the courtyard and during the card games on the boat, when Colonel Harrington was cheating to change his cards. Also the clumsy parts of Charles messing up his suits were my favorites. It’s quite ironic how the palm trick Charles showed was how Colonel Harrington was able to keep the $32,000 check he pretended he ripped up. Charles Pike is perceived to be a foolish man. Eventually we reach a point in the movie where we no longer know for sure who is conning who anymore.  The characters make reference to the war, such as statements like “Toast to the war, coming on the submarine” and the impersonation of Hitler.  It’s an interesting scene when we see that Charles uses the same line on the woman (who he doesn’t know is Jean) which we heard him say to Jean before. It’s especially clever to see how the horse in the back would nudge Charles in the head every so often as if to show that even as an animal, is aware of Charles’ use of old lines. We get this idea of how a man of his status (educated and wealthy) uses the same tactics in talking to a woman in such a boring and unskillful manner.  It’s also quite impossible to believe that Jean, a con artist who is usually “money hungry” actually doesn’t want money the one chance she is offered or able to get it. During the movie, I found myself questioning whether Colonel Harrington was really the woman’s (Jean’s) father. At the end, we see this concept of double standard, when the couple (Charles and Jean) goes into the room together on the boat, because technically they’re married (to each other). We get the idea that bad girls aren’t as bad as they are, while good girls are only half as good as they think they are.  To be honest, I get the whole idea of the movie and what it’s about.. but there are still parts of it that I’m a bit confused about. Like whether Charles really has no clue whatsoever that Jean on the boat is his wife. Or whether she really loved him since she didn’t want the money, and knew he was the man all along. I’m going to watch the movie again when I get a chance to, and hopefully I’ll have a better idea of the movie and be less confused by then. Overall, I really enjoyed the movie.

 

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